Source: dailyinfographic.com

julirps:

Do you know all these expressions about hands? Most of them are cliches, but using just about any cliche is forgivable if you do so in a fresh way, or to add a note of humor.

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hermajestyhelps:

Grammar is the way in which words are put together to form sentences. Here are 11 tips to help you learn and remember all the grammar rules on punctuation, word choice, and more. 

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Source: hermajestyhelps

nevver:

  1. PEA
    Originally the word was “pease,” and it was singular.The sound on the end was reanalyzed as a plural ‘s’ marker.
  2. CHERRY
    The same thing happened to “cherise” or “cheris,” which came from Old French “cherise” and was reanalyzed as a plural. So the singular “cherry” was born.
  3. APRON
    Originally “napron” often enough as “an apron” that by the 1600s the “n” was dropped.
  4. UMPIRE
    Umpire lost its ‘n’ from the same sort of confusion. Orinally nompere, the n-less form won out.
  5. NEWT
    A newt was originally an “ewt” - with “an” thus it became the “newt.”
  6. NICKNAME
    The ‘n’ also traveled over from the “an” to stick to “nickname,” which was originally “ekename,” meaning “added name.”
  7. ALLIGATOR
    Alligator came to English from the Spanish explorers who first encountered “el lagarto” (lizard) in the New World.
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Source: nevver


amandaonwriting:

verb tenses with timelines

amandaonwriting:

verb tenses with timelines


Source: amandaonwriting

Here you will find all of the interactive quizzes compiled by Grammar.ccc from various sources. These sources include Sentence Sense: A Writer’s Guide, English faculty at an estimable midwestern university, and students in Professor Karyn Hollis’s Tutor Training course at Villanova University.

All links from this post jump directly to the listed quiz.

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Source: grammar.ccc.commnet.edu

These links represent the index of pages from Grammar.ccc, an excellent resource for all things English grammar.

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Source: grammar.ccc.commnet.edu

by David B. Tower & Benjamin F. Tweed
Three little words you often see
Are ARTICLESa, an, and the.

NOUN's the name of anything,
As: school or gardentoy, or swing.

ADJECTIVES tell the kind of noun,
As: great, small, pretty, white, or brown.

VERBS tell of something being done: 
To read, write, count, sing, jump, or run.

How things are done the ADVERBS tell, 
As: slowly, quickly, badly, well.

CONJUNCTIONS join the words together,
As: men and women, wind or weather.

The PREPOSITION stands before
A noun as: in or through a door.

The INTERJECTION shows surprise
As: Oh, how pretty! Ah! how wise!

The whole are called the PARTS of SPEECH,
Which reading, writing, speaking teach.

"Why the song leaves out pronouns is a mystery. A writer from Richland, Washington, suggests ‘A PRONOUN replaces any noun: / he, she, it, and you are found.’” —Grammar.ccc’s page “Definitions of Basic Sentence Parts”


Source: grammar.ccc.commnet.edu

julirps:

One of the best ways to make your writing stronger is to cut unnecessary words. Many people tend to over-write, often in a similar way to how they would speak. Words creep in that add no meaning and can make a piece of writing sound vague and woolly rather than confidence and precise.

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