I’m not sick but I’m not well by Lit on Grooveshark

Writer’s Block

Music is love in search of a word. Find the words.

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this song. Write something about this song.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!


thecrashcourse:

Before I Got My Eye Put Out - The Poetry of Emily Dickinson: Crash Course English Lit #8

In which John Green concludes the Crash Course Literature mini-series with an examination of the poetry of Emily Dickinson. Sure, John explores the creepy biographical details of Dickinson’s life, but he also gets into why her poems have remained relevant over the decades. John discusses Dickinson’s language, the structure of her work, her cake recipes. He also talks about Dickinson’s famously eccentric punctuation, which again ends up relating to her cake recipes. Also, Dickinson’s coconut cake recipe is included. Also, here are links to some of the poems discussed in the video:


thecrashcourse:

Like Pale Gold - The Great Gatsby Part I: Crash Course English Literature #4

In which John Green explores F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel of the Jazz Age, The Great Gatsby. John introduces you to Nick Carraway, Jay Gatsby, Daisy and Tom Buchanan, and the other characters in the novel, and tries to look beyond the surface story to figure out what this thing is ABOUT. Set in the 1920’s against a conflicted backdrop of prohibition and excess, The Great Gatsby takes a close look at the American Dream as it existed in Fitzgerald’s time. It turns out, it had a lot to do with money and status, and it still does today. John will cover the rich symbolism of the novel, from the distant green light to the pale gold of wealth and decay. Also, Paris Hilton drops by.


  1. Aim at being unique, not ordinary. Go right past the dull.
  2. Cataloging your ideas is productive because it allows you to go back and take a second gander while viewing your ideas on much larger scale.
  3. Use visual structuring. Getting your paper and pencil out not only lets you see your ideas on a physical level, but it will make you feel like a kid again.
  4. If all else fails, keep working. Some individuals work better as they reach their breaking point, they excel and take flight in the hardest of times.

  1. Practice thinking. Think about things and formulate some opinions. They may be right, they may be wrong, but I bet they’ll be interesting.
  2. Use life markers for ideas. Old photos, family stories, a journal entry, a souvenir from a trip, a collection you love or a piece of clothing–if you’ve saved it for a reason there is most likely a story there.
  3. Look at your life as if you’re a stranger. Good writing is made up of details so learn to see the details of your own life.
  4. Look at what inspires other people’s creativity and then put your own personal spin on it. But whatever you do make it your own and bring your own life and talents to the task.
  5. Make lists. What are your favorites? Foods, colors, flowers, cars, games, habits? What are your pet peeves, your thrills or your favorite vacation spots? Use lists to spark an idea and run with it.

Blood Room Temp by Assassinate The Scientist on Grooveshark

Writer’s Block

Music is love in search of a word. Find the words.
 

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this song. Write something about this song.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!


The Voiceless by And So I Watch You From Afar on Grooveshark

Writer’s Block

Music is love in search of a word. Find the words.
 

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this song. Write something about this song.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!


Speak your writing and record it.

Stuck? Often just talking about what it is that you have in mind, can bring a lot more ideas and developments to mind. So record what you want to communicate, then transcribe it and edit it later.

When you speak, you are spending very little conscious attention to what it is you are saying - it just comes out! This is an easy and brilliant way to defeat your “squelcher” and get you started expressing. You can get on a roll immediately!

Use transcription software (Express Scribe, Transcriber) to make it easier to control the playback for your typing. Or use an internet service like idictate.com, or Fantastic Transcripts, etc.

Read More


Source: endwritersblock.com

You Take My Breath Away (Original) by The Knife on Grooveshark

Writer’s Block

Music is love in search of a word. Find the words.
 

Mission: Write a story, a description, a poem, a metaphor, a commentary, or a critique about this song. Write something about this song.

Be sure to tag writeworld in your block!


  1. Stop being (other people’s) perfect. The expectation of making something perfect uses up emotional energy that you could put to much better use being creative and artistic.
  2. Ask yourself if you’re doing it for the right reasons. Even if you are not the best in the world at something, if you are really passionate about it, your passion can be an inspiration and motivation for others.