How It’s Said (substitutes)
In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.
In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.
In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.
In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.
In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.
In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.
In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.
In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.
In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.
In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.
In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.
As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.
[Source] [[Jack Teagle]

How It’s Said (substitutes)

In a happy way: laughed, rejoiced, giggled, joked, lilted, sang out.

In a sad way: cried, agonised, bawled, blubbered, lamented, sobbed, groaned, snivelled, wept, mourned.

In a bossy way: insisted, bossed, demanded, preached, dictated, professed, ordered.

In an angry way: raged, miffed, seethed, fumed, retorted, thundered, blurted.

In a pained way: barked, cried out, cried, screamed, jabbered, bellowed, groaned, howled, shrieked, roared, grieved, wailed, yelped.

In a frightened way: quaked, stammered, shuddered, quivered, trembled.

In an understanding way: empathised, accepted, consoled, crooned, comforted, sympathised, agreed.

In a tired way: mumbled, struggled, emitted, wearied.

In a begging way: beseeched, begged, implored, pleaded, entreated, appealed to.

In a mocking way: mocked, ridiculed, derided, hooted, japed, insulted, jeered, parodied, taunted, teased, chaffed, flouted, degraded, sneered, disdained, jibed, gibed, disparaged, belittled, decried, flouted, fleered, leered, scoffed, sniggered, swiped, scorned, repudiated, lampooned.

In a seductive way: purred, simpered, coaxed, wheedled, persuaded, baited.

As an answer: As an answer: responded, retorted, replied, rejoined, answered, acknowledged.

[Source] [[Jack Teagle]


Source: victoriousvocabulary

theyuniversity:

(Source: Pinterest)

theyuniversity:

(Source: Pinterest)


Anonymous asked: "aloud vs out loud?"

theyuniversity:

Aloud” is the more formal version of “out loud.” Feel free to use it in your essays for school.

As far as “out loud” is concerned, it is a perfectly legitimate word that can be used on Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, text messages, and in other informal settings.

Don’t worry: not many teachers—if any—will think less of you for choosing to use “out loud” instead of “aloud.”

Having said that, since “out loud” is so mainstream, show your hipster diction by employing “aloud” in your writing.

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That’s all there is to it.

Cheers.

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Source: theyuniversity

bookgeekconfessions:

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As with all activities, writing fiction involves getting to grips with professional jargon. The following are some of the more common terms you may come across as you learn your craft and market your writing.

POV (Point of View): the eyes through which the events of a story are seen.

MC: The main character in a story.

WIP (Work in progress): the thing you are currently working on.

Simsub (Simultaneous submission): submitting the same piece of work to more than one magazine/publisher at the same time.

Multisub (Multiple submission): sending more than one work to the same magazine/publisher at the same time.

MG (Middle Grade): generally speaking, readers between 8 and 12 years old.

YA (Young Adult): generally speaking, readers between 12 and 18 years old.

MS/MSS: MS means manuscript. MSS is the plural, manuscripts.

GL: Guidelines, describing what a publisher is interested in seeing.

DL: Deadline: the cut off-date for a submission.

Query Letter: A concise (one-page) pitch of an idea to an agent/publisher, to see if they are interested in reading a manuscript.

Bio: Biographical details as supplied to an agent or publisher, including, for example, any previous writing credits.

Slush/Slushpile: A pile, often large, of unsolicited manuscripts sent to a publisher or editor.

Read More


Source: dailywritingtips.com

1. A SERIES OF WORD CHOICES

Here’s why this matters: because both writing and storytelling comprise, at the most basic level, a series of word choices. Words are the building blocks of what we do. They are the atoms of our elements. They are the eggs in our omelets. They are the shots of liquor in our cocktails. Get it right? Serendipity. Get it wrong? The air turns to arsenic, that cocktail makes you puke, this omelet tastes like balls.

2. WORDS DEFINE REALITY

Words are like LEGO bricks: the more we add, the more we define the reality of our playset. “The dog fucked the chicken” tells us something. “The Great Dane fucked the chicken” tells us more. “The Great Dane fucked the bucket of fried chicken on the roof of Old Man Dongweather’s barn, barking with every thrust” goes the distance and defines reality in a host of ways (most of them rather unpleasant). You can over-define. Too many words spoil the soup. Find the balance between clarity, elegance, and evocation.

Read More →


Source: terribleminds.com

"Genre: From the French genre for “kind” or “type”, the classification of literary works on the basis of their content, form, or technique. The term also refers to individual classifications."

The Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms, second edition, edited by Ross Murfin and Supriya M. Ray

(Because 2014 is the Year of the Genre Hop, and genre is important.)


amandaonwriting:

20 Fabulous Alternatives to the Word Awesome

amandaonwriting:

20 Fabulous Alternatives to the Word Awesome


badass-franks:

This, in a way, is a table of contents in compensation for the mixed links on the ‘word lists’ tag, although not all of their word lists are on this masterpost - these are just the ones that I’m expecting to use consistently. If you see this, feel free to add your own helpful links. None of these…

Useful!


amandaonwriting:

verb tenses with timelines

amandaonwriting:

verb tenses with timelines


Source: amandaonwriting

No, the Word of the Day isn’t “Discontinuation.” We’re discontinuing the Word of the Day. Our reasons are twofold:

First, it isn’t our content. We’ve never claimed it was our content, but it’s a little nonsensical for us to slap a website’s feature on our blog every day. It’s their feature. For the record, if you want to keep receiving Words of the Day, sign up for the email system on Dictionary.com (left side of the page).

Second, it’s a bit of a nuisance. Molding the Word of the Day into a Tumbl-appropriate format takes some time. Not an absurd amount of time, but it’s time that we could be spending writing articles or answering asks.

If you’re interested in vocabulary, we’d recommend victoriousvocabulary, wordthink, vocabulary.com, and the Merriam-Webster Word of the Day.

Thanks for reading our blog!
The Team