Anonymous asked: "I journeyed to Tumblr from Blogger, and I've noticed that the majority of "blogs" on here consist of pretty pictures and people (most of which aren't original material) - 'reblogging?' really? o_o - so are there bloggers who actually post interesting thoughts, both personal & writing-related? I want to make lots of writer friends & talk about each other's novels and ideas, etc. Idek, the spirit of blogging doesn't seem to exist here on Tumblr, which is extremely sad. :c"

Hey there, former Blogger! Welcome to Tumblr, land of eccentric photo rebloggers and emotional gifers! We are a visually-inclined bunch, that’s for sure, but, as with all things worth exploring, there’s more to Tumblr than meets the eye.

Rest assured that there are tons of writing-centric blogs on Tumblr. I bet a few of them would be willing to show you the ropes!

So, how about it, Tumblr writers? Is anyone interested in making a new writer friend today? They might be anonymous, but leave a comment on this post and maybe they can get in touch that way. 

Thank you to the anon for their message, and to everyone else for being such an awesome community of writers, readers, and everything in between!

-C

Anonymous said: Hello there! I’m not going to argue with what last anon said, but yes, Tumblr is very different from Blogger, which is, well, the reason why Tumblr exist since why have two sites that work the same way? Tumblr isn’t Blogger, after all, but even though a good majority (I guess?) do /reblog/ content, there are also the ones who own art tumblrs and writing tumblrs, of course. I hope anon can find what they’re looking for. Don’t get discouraged!

(Obligatory question mark?)


August 17th, 2014 — August 23rd, 2014

The Weekly Round-Up is a collection of questions from our inbox which can be answered in one hundred words or fewer. These posts are intended to keep your dashboard clutter-free while we address a few of the anonymous questions we receive each week. If you don’t want to see these at all (understandable) then blacklist the tag “writeworld weekly roundup”. 

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August 10th, 2014 — August 16th, 2014

The Weekly Round-Up is a collection of questions from our inbox which can be answered in one hundred words or fewer. These posts are intended to keep your dashboard clutter-free while we address a few of the anonymous questions we receive each week. If you don’t want to see these at all (understandable) then blacklist the tag “writeworld weekly roundup”. 

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Anonymous said: Any tips on how to create a good and convincing urban legend?

First off, what is an urban legend? 

urban legend (n): a humorous or horrific story or piece of information circulated as though true, especially one purporting to involve someone vaguely related or known to the teller.

Urban legends, also known as urban myths or urban tales, are a kind of contemporary legend and are classified as folklore by sociologists and folklorists. They often combine elements of the fantastical with those of the mundane to create something vaguely believable. 

Urban legends do not have to take place in urban areas; in fact, there are no hard and fast rules for urban legends at all. The only requisite for the designation of “urban legend” seems to be a memorable short story worth telling your friends to creep them out or make them laugh.

How do these stories reach their audiences? Word of mouth, of course, or something very close to it.

"Urban legends are sometimes repeated in news stories and, in recent years, distributed by e-mail or social media. People frequently allege that such tales happened to a "friend of a friend" (FOAF); the phrase has become a commonly used term when recounting this type of story." (from Wikipedia: Urban Legends)

One urban legend can be passed down through generations with only minor changes to the overall narrative, and similar urban legends can be found thousands of miles apart in vastly disparate cultures. 

Contemporary (“urban”) legends are one of the most pervasive forms of folklore in active circulation, but they are far from a modern phenomenon. The same processes of using narrative to communicate and negotiate anomalous experiences can be traced back thousands of years. Contemporary legends are contemporary to the teller and audience, not solely to the scholar. And what had been thought of as purely local narratives were found to exist in multiple manifestations throughout the world. (from the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research website, ContemporaryLegend.org)

I’d recommend starting by reading a lot of urban legends. Here are a few links:

Once you’ve bulked up your urban legends knowledge, the next step is making sure that your legend is convincing. Here are a few tips to get you started:

Need more help? Check out these links for creating your own urban legend!

Thank you for your question, and good luck with creating your own urban legends! 

-C

P.S. If any of our fellow writers have tips for the anon here, I’d love to include them, so send us a message or reblog with your comments!


angelwouldbeking asked: "Do you know of anyone out there willing to read and critique a short story I wrote (you can do it too if you're not too busy.)? I've been asking for a week now and I can't find anyone. If you can't think of anyone, can you post this ask so maybe I can find someone? Thank you."

If anyone would like to help out angelwouldbeking by critiquing their short story, please respond to this post or message them instead.

Thank you!

-C

A REMINDER: Please do not send us messages responding to this post. It is better to cut out the middle man and reply to angelwouldbeking directly.


 said: How many subplots are too many? In my book I’ve got this city guard who is working to quell rebellion, break up riots and fights amongst the civilians. At the same time her friend is a wanted criminal and she has to decide whether or not to turn him in and at the same time her other friend is struggling with alcoholism and someone else is grief-stricken from the death of his GF and at least four other things. How many subplots can I include before it all becomes too confusing for the reader?

Let’s start with the definition of subplot:

Subplot (n): An additional story line to the main plot of a fictional story

There are no laws dictating how many subplots are to be allowed in a single piece of writing. You’re only really limited by your own ability to handle multiple subplots, and honing that ability takes practice. And practicing means you might fail.

Don’t be afraid of failure. Writing is a process. Failing is part of that process. The important part is that you try and keep trying.

Sometimes it takes a whole lot of effort to gain your confidence. You might have to work at crafting your subplots for a long time before you feel like you’ve truly braided them into your story with expert deftness.

Asking us for a number isn’t really going to help you because, as it turns out, we don’t know. We don’t know you as a writer, and we don’t know your story. You’ve got to figure out what works. In the end, only you can decide what’s best for your story.

So, how many subplots can you include before it all becomes too confusing? It depends on your story, your style, your skill. And it depends on how many times you are willing to try and fail before you succeed. 

Some things to keep in mind about subplots: 

LINKS!

Thanks for your question!

-H


August 3rd, 2014— August 9th, 2014

The Weekly Round-Up is a collection of questions from our inbox which can be answered in one hundred words or fewer. These posts are intended to keep your dashboard clutter-free while we address a few of the anonymous questions we receive each week. If you don’t want to see these at all (understandable) then blacklist the tag “writeworld weekly roundup”. 

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Anonymous asked: "If you don't answer all of our questions (understandably due to the amount you receive) do you have any suggestions on where else to go besides google?"

Check out our list of Tumblr writing help blogs we follow. I bet other blogs in our community could help you out!

I hesitate to mention any blogs in particular because I’d hate to leave anyone out. Really, they are all so talented. Be sure to have a poke around our follow list.

Thanks for your question (and your patience)!

-C


Anonymous asked: "I see that you have included "nip" in your list of alternatives to the word "walk," but I have had trouble finding your definition anywhere else. Could you explain this? Is it by chance strictly British? When I search my dictionary or even Google for the definition of "nip," I never find "to walk briskly as if on an errand" (paraphrasing your definition). Thanks."

Nip, a word on our Word List: Alternatives to “Walk,” is primarily a Britishism (though I think Aussies and Canadians also use it). 

Here are two definitions from around the internet:

Cambridge Dictionary Online

Nip (v)

to go somewhere quickly or be somewhere for only a short time:

  • Can you nip out/round/down to the shop for me?
  • Shall we nip in to the café for a bite to eat?

Free Dictionary

Nip (v)

to move quickly; to make a quick, usually short, journey.

  • I’ll just nip into this shop for cigarettes
  • He nipped over to Paris for the week-end.

I’ve added some further explanation to the original post, and I hope this clears things up a bit!

Cheers!

-C

EDIT: See the comments for further explanation!


I’m coming up sort of blank, so I’ll put this to our fellow writers and readers. Here’s a selection of recommendations from the comments section of this post. There’s quite a wide variety!

Lauren-intheskywithdiamonds adds: In my opinion, every book (except romance…) is great to read when you feel heartbroken because the stories can be used as distractors!

Trouble-aka-flick adds: Read the stories that you like, the genres and topics that are like your security blanket, for comfort. I would read fantasy, but thats me.

There are a ton more book recommendations in the comments!

Anyone have a recommendation for our heartbroken anon?